HENRY RASMUSSEN
Title: Libertad A Los Preso Politico 
 
Medium: Acrylic, Spray Paint And Colored Pencil On Canvas

Dimensions: 60" x 48"

Year: 2009Title: No Violencia Es Fuerza

Medium: Acrylic, Spray Paint And Oil Stick On Canvas

Dimensions: 48" x 60"

Year: 2009Title: Contra Toda Policia

Medium: Acrylic And Spray Paint On Corrugated Fiberglass Panels Mounted On Wood

Dimensions: 48" x 60" x 4"

Year: 2009Title: Asesinos Legales Nunca Mas

Medium: Acrylic, Spray Paint And Oil Stick On Canvas

Dimensions: 60" x 48"

Year: 2009Title: Donde Esta Luciano Arruga?

Medium: Acrylic, Spray Paint And Oil Stick On Canvas

Dimensions: 60" x 48"

Year: 2009Title: Pasion De Multitudes

Medium: Acrylic, Spray Paint And Oil Stick On Canvas With Bullet-Hole Perforations

Dimensions: 48" x 60"

Year: 2009Title: El Exilio Universal 

Medium: Acrylic, Spray Paint And Color Pencil On Canvas

Dimensions: 48" x 48"

Year: 2009Title: Nunca Mas

Medium: Acrylic, Spray Paint And Color Pencil On Canvas

Dimensions: 36" x 48"

Year: 2009Title: Club Atlantico

Medium: Acrylic, Spray Paint And Oil Stick On Wood Moulding Attached To Wood Panel

Dimensions: 60" x 48" x 4"

Year: 2009Title: Preso Politico

Medium: Acrylic And Spray Paint On Canvas

Dimensions: 36" x 36"

Year: 2009Title: Preso Politico
(detail image A)
Medium: Acrylic And Spray Paint On Canvas

Dimensions: 36" x 36"

Year: 2009Title: Preso Politico
(detail image B)
Medium: Acrylic And Spray Paint On Canvas

Dimensions: 36" x 36"

Year: 2009
Buenos Aires Graffiti Series


CRY FOR ME ARGENTINA, a series comprising twelve paintings, was inspired by photographs Rasmussen made in 2009 of graffiti found on walls in Buenos Aires during a three-week stay in the Argentinean capital. The messages he chose as subjects for his camera—scribbled, scratched and spray-painted onto stucco facades and corrugated steel sidings—were primarily encountered in the San Telmo barrio, and reflect the agony of the turbulent years when the nation was ruled by a military junta, a period referred to as Argentina’s Dirty War, lasting between 1976 and 1983. It is claimed that as many as 10,000 critics of the regime were killed, 30,000 were “disappeared,“ and 60,000 were tortured during one of recent history’s most contemptible instances of state sponsored terror.

To this day, every Thursday, women of the Mothers of Plaza de Mayo, an organization formed by mothers whose sons and daughters were “disappeared“ during these years, march in protest in front of Casa Rosada, the Presidential Palace. While some of the graffiti Rasmussen saw through the lens showed signs of having been in place for some time, most were of recent date—a poignant illustration of the fact that the scars of the Dirty War have not healed, with thousands of victims still unaccounted for.

The phrases captured in the paintings were reproduced word for word from the photographs; the images built around them, on the other hand, were products of the imagination. While most artists seek to develop a singular, unique style, recognized as their “own,“ Rasmussen chooses to express himself in a variety of ways. This aspect is perhaps particularly apparent in his Cry For Me Argentina series: the relatively realistic style of Asesinos Legales Nunca Mas, stands in contrast to the brash spray-paint technique of Contra Toda Policia (applied to corrugated fiberglass panels), and the multi-layered lettering of Donde Esta Luciano Arruga? (where the words have been gradually sanded away, as in a fading memory).

The paintings in this and The Becomberga Mask series also illustrate Rasmussen’s choice to reject, for his own work, art created exclusively for the purpose of decoration in favor of art with the aim of expressing social concerns.
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